Tag Archives: IBS

Target Product Profile – A Better Antibiotic For Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth

An estimated 700 million people are adversely affected by irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), that is one out of every ten people in the world. While IBS is not a life-threatening disease, it has a significant impact on quality of life. Small Intestine Bacterial Overgrowth (SIBO) is implicated in majority of the cases of irritable bowel syndrome (1). Beyond digestive disorders, SIBO has also been shown to have a positive correlation with a wide spectrum of diseases including Alzheimer’s (2), Parkinsons (3), Multiple Sclerosis (4), Coronary Artery Disease (5), Psoriasis (6), and Cancer (7). The treatment of SIBO is multi-faceted, but a major aspect is addressing bacterial overgrowth via use of antibiotics. Continue reading

The Missing Piece Towards Improving And Standardizing SIBO Breath Tests

I have irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Research suggests Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth can explain IBS symptoms in as much as 78% of the cases (1). So, I reached out to the top doctors across the country to get properly tested and diagnosed. Here is what I found out:

  • Stanford and Augusta recommend SIBO detection via Glucose breath tests
  • Cedars Sinai recommends Lactulose breath test
  • Mayo Clinic does not recommend doing a SIBO breath test at all for IBS-C patients

If the top institutes cannot agree on an important protocol to identify whether problem lies in the small intestine, then the patients don’t have a prayer to get properly diagnosed and treated. There have been efforts to drive consensus (2) but so far that has not moved the needle for something as basic as deciding between Glucose vs Lactulose breath test. So, what is the problem? Let’s dig deeper. There are two mainstream approaches to do SIBO breath tests: Continue reading